Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Kiss Off!


In conjunction with the Kiss Contest, Valeire Cole has a best Kiss Off event running at her site. http://www.valerie-cole.com/   Hop over and take a peek at the finalists.

This competition was tough because you only entered your first sentence, and then the voting went from there.  I didn’t even scratch the top ten, but had a fun time writing the scene.  It was the first time I tried writing in first person, but that only added to the enjoyment of the attempt.

Enjoy!

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     Spike always had something up his sleeve.  His call earlier to see ‘what I was up to tonight’, turned into me driving us from San Diego to Huntington Beach, for a double date with a woman I didn’t know.  I’d met her briefly at one of Spike’s famous parties last weekend, but it was just a quick hello. 
     “Is she the blonde or the brunette?” I asked.
     “Jamie, the blonde, you remember, the models from LA” 
     “Yeah, I’ll be your wingman.”  The things you do for friends.

     I’d never been out with a woman like Jamie, and as I spent the day in nervous preparation, my insecurities threatened to turn me into an incoherent comedy sidekick.  The plan was to meet at their condo about eight, go to a club, then play it by ear.  Fortunately, I could hold my own on a dance floor and maybe the politeness instilled by my parents would help.  My heart pounded like a jackhammer as we walked to the door and when Jamie answered it, all of my well-intended preparation called a cab and headed back to San Diego. 
     Her deep blue eyes glued me to the porch as her full lips parted in a slight smile.  “You found us,” she said in a sultry voice.  “Come on in.”  She looked like she’d stepped from a Victoria’s Secret catalogue and just happened to throw on some clothes.  The jeans and semi-opaque top clung to all the right places, revealing just enough to make me want to see more.  She walked ahead of us, her perfect derriere, dancing the tight pants.  If she had a quarter in her pocket, I could have told you if it was heads or tails.  Spike gave me a light push.
     “Step in slick,” he said.
     We had drinks, chatted, and got acquainted before leaving.  I surprised myself by holding my own, making her laugh, and even flirting without a shut down.  Maybe the evening would work out after all.  In the car, Spike and Linda got in the back, while Jamie slid into the front seat next to me.  She set her hand on my arm, sending a small tingle down my spine.  “I’ll tell you where to go.”
     “Sounds good to me,” I replied, with a smile.
     A few miles down the road, a mall came into sight and she said, “Pull in there.”   
     “There’s a club at the mall?” Spike asked from the back seat.
     “I just want to check something real quick.” 
     We drove through the crowded lot until she pointed at a marquee.  “Oh look, The Frightening is playing!”
     “You mean the movie?” Linda asked.
     “Yes, can we see it?  I’ve been waiting for it to come out.”
     Horror movies and I do not get along.  The last time friends talked me into watching one I spent the whole show looking at the heads in front of us pretending to watch the screen.  Even then, the sound track gave me nightmares.  So, I tried an honest approach.  “Hey, I’m a total horror wimp.  I just can’t take ‘em, sorry.”  I smiled to take the edge off.
     “We were looking forward to dancing,” Spike said.
     “I want to go see it, c’mon guys it’ll be fun.”
     “Seriously,” I replied.  “They scare the crap out of me.”
     “I’ll hold your hand and protect you.  Pleeeeease.”   She leaned close, her breast pressed against my arm through the thin material.  “You’ll be ok.”
     There goes the evening, I’ll give in and have to walk out half way through the show, or worse, try to fake my way through it and pay for it with weeks of sleepless nights.  It wasn’t worth it.  “Exactly, its just not worth it.” I thought.  I pulled toward the theater.
     “We’re going?” Jamie asked.
     I heard a sigh from Linda.
     “Well, you seem like you really want to go,” I replied.
     “I do!”
     I stopped in front of ticket booth and put the car in park.  “Okay, here ya go.”
     “Great, I’ll get tickets while you park the car.”
     “Nah, just get one for yourself, we’ll go dancing and pick you up later.”
     “WHAT?”
     I shrugged, both over the loss of a fun evening, and as an answer.  “Hey, you want to see it so bad, and I told you I couldn’t go.  I don’t want to disappoint you.”
     “I can’t believe this!”  She crossed her arms and glared first at me, then out the window, and I mentally sighed.  She was even cute when she was mad, but no going back now.
     “So, are you getting out?” I asked.
     “No.  Just drive, we’ll go to the club.
     I pulled away from the theater, the quiet car thick with tension.  As we turned onto the road I said, “What’s wrong Jamie, hasn’t anyone ever told you no before?”
     I heard Linda gasp and Spike stifle a laugh.
     She remained stonily silent.  Miles down the road as Linda directed us; Jamie’s hand found mine and guided it high on her thigh.  She leaned over and whispered I my ear, “I’m not used to being told no, but I think I like it.”